Life Science

Harvard project compares medical files with genetics

A new project designed at Harvard takes computers, using artificial intelligence, to scan the private medical files of 2.5 million people at local hospitals, as part of a NIH-funded effort to find the genetic roots of diseases. The story is reported today in the The Boston Globe by reporter Gareth Cook, so check it out. The Globe story says that ...

Read More »

Nanoparticles carry cancer-killing drugs into tumor cells

It strikes me as somewhat ironic that one of the first practical and profitable uses for nanotechnology will be making delivery vehicles for chemotherapeutic agents. No, not itsy-bitsy submarines, but molecules that are designed to have an affinity for cancer cells. The idea is get more chemo to cancer cells and less to normal cells. From Eureka Alert: "This is ...

Read More »

NIH starts "Roadmap" to study small molecules

Around the American Cancer Society we talk alot about screening – cancer screening. The ACS believes that early detection exams and tests can help save lives and reduce suffering from many cancers. The ACS also supports the idea of advancing innovative, high-impact research, and thus the following story is of interest. The news today is about a type of screening ...

Read More »

Promises to keep

Going to be an interesting day. I’m attending a conference at Stanford U entitled "Realizing the Promise: Early Detection of Cancer."  Pat Felts, Dr. Georjean Stoodt, and Dr. Cynthia LeBlanc and a cadre of California Division and NHO staff are here as well. The spark-plug for the conference is Dr. Lee Hartwell, ACS Professor, Medal of Honor winner and Nobel ...

Read More »