Exa what?

Yahoo! News – 5 ‘exabytes’ of information created in ’02, report says

If you feel like you’re drowning in stuff coming through your computer, it’s official: you are.

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  1. The scary thing about this overload of info and our inability to absorb or utilize it, is that many missing pieces in cancer research could have already been discovered. Today’s students and scientists may not be aware and cannot do their thinking or research “standing on the shoulders” of those who wandered down this path before and made seemingly insignificant discoveries.

  2. Excellent observation, Carol. I’m e-mailing yyou an article about how far some science professionals are going to keep up with the load.

    And you might check the following link out. It gives me some encouragement.

    http://www.corante.com/livingcode/20031001.shtml#57614

  3. Thanks for both pieces of information. While Highwire Press has a great idea, I am more encouraged by the concept of “text mining”. The interrelations outlined by Highwire are already recognized by the authors of the articles (though not into the future). But text mining could possibly pick up relationships totally unknown to/overlooked by the researcher. Loved the mining graphic.

  4. Yeah, text mining may be able to extract associations from information that are not at all obvious. But dealing with lots of data or information will be a wide-spread problem. At BIOSILICO companies making hardware and software for displaying the huge volumes of life science data now flooding in say they’re working on virtual reality displays of data for scientists that may involve fly-through, walk-through or even holographic displays. Even with that, they say that the vision-oriented cortex of the brain may be too limited to enable researchers to interpret or “get” what’s being presented, so they’re working with tying data fluxes to sounds that use other brain areas. Moreover, the data deluge that scientists are experiencing will trickle—no, gush—down to doctors and even patients. One executive remarked that youngsters who listen to music, play a videogame and handle 4 or 5 IM conversations simultaneously are preparing to deal with routine information they’ll be seeing a decade from now.

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